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Archive for the ‘My Works’ Category

My article on Libya

My article on Libya published in the Spring issue 2013 of ASIA Magazine, Seoul, South Korea.

Click Here to download or read the article.

My Cover Story on Delhi

My Cover Story on Delhi published in the Winter Issue 2012 of ASIA Magazine, Seoul, South Korea.

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My Recent Editorials in Indian Literature

Recent Editorials in Indian Literature

Editorial IL271(September-October 2012) : Click Here to download or read the article.

Editorial IL270(July-August 2012) : Click Here to download or read the article.

Editorial IL269(May-June 2012) : Click Hereto download or read the article.

Editorial IL268(March-April 2012) : Click Here to download or read the article.

Editorial IL267(January-February 2012) : Click Hereto download or read the article.

Editorial IL266(November-December 2011) : Click Here to download or read the article.

Editorial IL264(July-August 2011) : Click Hereto download or read the article.

Editorial IL265(September-October 2011) : Click Here to download or read the article.

Review of Banipal Magazine: Desert Spring

The review of Banipal magazine, published in ‘The Hindu’ on 5th June 2011, titled “Desert Spring”

Link: http://www.hindu.com/lr/2011/06/05/stories/2011060550150400.htm

The Red Hibiscus Revolution

An article on Libya in the OPEN magazine

Link: http://www.openthemagazine.com/article/international/the-red-hibiscus-revolution

Once my CITY

An article on my city Ajdabiya, Libya in ‘The Hindu’ Sunday Magazine.

Link: http://www.hindu.com/mag/2011/04/03/stories/2011040350010100.htm

The responses to this cover story on ‘The Hindu’ can be found here.

T P Rajeevan’s review of This Ancient Lyre in The Hindu literary review

New Delhi

25 October 2005

This Ancient Lyre: Selected Poems, O.N.V. Kurup, edited by A.J. Thomas

FOR a poet of ONV’s stature, immensely popular and widely acknowledged, This Ancient Lyre itself is a belated publication. But, the dexterity with which it is brought out, edited by A.J. Thomas and published by the Sahitya Akademi, compensates for the lateness. And the poet is fortunate in that the translators are genuinely talented, some among them, like R. Viswanathan, who didn’t live to see this book, T. R. Joy, and Lekshmy Rajeev themselves being poets. Read the rest of this entry »

My Editor’s Note to “This Ancient Lyre”

No man was ever yet a great poet, without being at the same time a profound philosopher—Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

Anyone who attempts to delve deep into the poetry of ONV Kurup will encounter this truth: the inspired poet, sustained by his great compassion and humaneness, captures beauty through choicest words and offers deep philosophic insights. The poet always strives to empower poetry, enabling it to attend to the spiritual needs of the succeeding generations of sensitive souls. For this, he takes special care to ensure that each of his poems is an inquiry into new realms of aesthetic experience. ONV (as he is referred to affectionately by poetry-lovers) does not even for a moment forget that his commitment, first and foremost, is to the aesthetic aspect of poetry. If it has to fulfill its various other functions, it has to be perfect in form and content in the first place. Word-music, harmonious rhythmic patterns and brimming poetic truth set ONV’s poetry apart. Read the rest of this entry »

Visitor at Midnight

Sadasivan looked up from his book, as if at an intruder. He looked at the strange number on the dial-screen. Hesitated for a moment, and then pressed the red button. And returned to the page.

The book was a novel about urban terrorism. Page after page of bomb-making, recce trips, planting of bombs in market places, killing of innocents….In the city he lived, these were facts of life. He could identify himself with the victims. In fact, he felt a strange thrill and even relief to reflect that he had not had the occasion to witness any of such gruesome incidents. Much more, deep down somewhere, he believed he would never be a victim. He would be spared somehow. This sense of immunity gave him a kind of exhilaration. These were happening to other people. He went on reading with a faint superstitious strain in his mind that reading this novel worked like an expiatory act, which provided possible protection against his being anywhere in the vicinity of such future attacks. The fascination for morbid details had chained him to the chair. Read the rest of this entry »

Libiyayil ninnu jevanum kondu…

Describes  Libiyan experience  and returns to India.

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